Feed the Future: A bipartisan opportunity

By Marshall Matz

© Copyright Agri-Pulse Communications, Inc.



The “Feed the Future” initiative is aimed at improving agriculture productivity and economic development around the world.  Bipartisan legislation has been introduced in the both the House and Senate to make this discretionary program permanent. The legislation has the support of private sector corporations as well as non-profit public interest organizations.  (H.R. 5656; S.2909)  To use an old phrase, the initiative teaches people how to fish rather than just distributing fish.  It deserves our attention. 

For generations, the United States has been a leader in providing agriculture development assistance across the globe to alleviate suffering and build shared progress and prosperity. But global food price spikes and resulting instability in 2007 and 2008 were a wake-up call that more needed to be done.

Feed the Future was borne out of the President Obama's pledge at the 2009 G-8 Summit in L'Aquila to mobilize at least $3.5 billion towards global food security-spurring commitments of $18.5 billion from other donors. But the United States has, in fact, thanks to tremendous bipartisan support, surpassed its goal and committed $5 billion in the fight to end hunger and malnutrition.

In 2010, the Administration launched “Feed the Future” (FTF), an initiative designed to expand and better coordinate the United States' investments in improving global food security. Feed the Future is a whole-of-government approach from USDA to AID and State.  It focuses on the dual objectives of improving farmer productivity, income, and livelihoods in developing countries while fighting hunger with a special focus on women and children in particular.

On September 18, 2014 Chairman Chris Smith with Rep. Betty McCollum in the House introduced the Global Food Security Act of 2014 in the House.  In the Senate the legislation was introduced by Senators Casey and Johanns with Senators Coons, Isakson, Cardin and Boozman. 

The Global Food Security Act is based on the premise that global food insecurity impacts not only the economies of developing nations but also the international economy and U.S. national security.  The bill recognizes the key role that agriculture development plays in economic growth. 

There is broad bipartisan support for sustaining Feed the Future due in large part to tremendous gains made over the past few years----

WORLDWIDE: Last year, Feed the Future helped more than 7 million smallholder farmers' access new tools and technologies to help them improve yields and boost incomes. Feed the Future also reached 12.5 million children with nutrition interventions.

ZAMBIA: Feed the Future played a key role in the record maize harvest for the 2013/14 cropping season (3.4 million metric tons - a 32 percent increase over the previous year's total) through policy advocacy and by helping smallholder farmers' access agricultural inputs such as improved seeds and fertilizers through private sector providers.

ETHIOPIA: Feed the Future and other U.S. Government programs are making progress toward achieving real reductions in stunting in Ethiopia. A recent nationwide survey shows stunting rates declined by over 9 percent over the past three years, even as the population grew, resulting in 160,000 fewer stunted children.

HONDURAS: More than 4,300 families are now well above the $1.25-per-day poverty line, thanks in part to Feed the Future's efforts, which increased horticulture sales by 125 percent last year.

BANGLADESH: Feed the Future reached 3.3 million smallholder farmers with improved seed, fertilizer and farm management practices, helping farmers increase rice yields by as much as 20 percent and creating additional rice sales of $25 million.

SENEGAL: Feed the Future introduced a new breed of high-yielding, high-protein rice that helps smallholder farmers' triple yields in a single year.

TANZANIA: Feed the Future helped increase horticulture yields by 44 percent and rice yields by more than 50 percent among farmers. The initiative assisted the Government of Tanzania in its efforts to turn the nation's fertile south into a breadbasket.

Dr. Raj Shah, AID Administrator"Through Feed the Future, we are harnessing the power of science, technology and innovation to unlock opportunities in agriculture for the world's most vulnerable people," said USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah. "By creating and scaling cutting-edge solutions to our most pressing agricultural challenges, we can help the world's most vulnerable people move from dependency to self-sufficiency-and out of the tragic cycle of extreme poverty.”

 

USDA's expertise is also critical in this effort. From research and extension to market development and trade USDA must play a central role for Feed the Future to be successful.  Secretary Vilsack has executed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa to help transfer research and extension expertise and that is a building block for Feed the Future. 

Feed the Future is not just a commitment of money, it is a new multi-department approach. Instead of merely providing food aid in times of crises, it establishes a new model to turn agriculture into a business-one that especially worked for women.

In short, the Global Food Security Act of 2014, the Smith (R-NJ) -Casey (D-PA) -Johanns (R-NE) legislation, compliments the successful PEPFAR program initiated by President Bush and uses our expertise in agriculture as the best possible foreign policy. The Global Food Security Act of 2014 presents an excellent opportunity to come together behind a piece of bipartisan legislation that puts our best foot forward as a country. 

Marshall Matz, formerly Counsel to the Senate Committee on Agriculture, specializes in global food security at OFW Law.  He serves on the Board of Directors of the World Food Program-USA; the Congressional Hunger Center; and the Food Research Action Center (FRAC)

 

 

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